Basic Movements for Daily Life

Posts tagged “strong

(Re)Build Your Foundation

My commute to work takes me through various parts of Central Alberta.  I get a chance to witness spectacular sunrises, sunsets, storms (winter, spring, summer and fall), a hint of the foothills and a taste of the prairies.  Honest to God, this is some of the most beautiful territory on Planet Earth.  Period.

On my journey one morning I noticed for the first time a place where a building used to stand. The building isn’t there anymore, but the concrete foundation is.  Farmland is all around it which has been tilled, planted and harvested many times around the square remains of whatever building used to stand there.  Roots, weeds and debris of all sort litter around it.

This got me thinking; if  a structure were to be reconstructed, the base, its foundation, is already there.  The basis onto which a building can be built is in place.  It’s likely solid and ready for any kind of construction.

Human foundation is much the same.  Once you’ve got that basic foundation constructed, the rest can be built.

Human foundations may vary from person to person.  If you’re struggling with healthy eating, build a basic foundation to start.  Remove one poor food choice from your menu and build from that.

If your foundation is to build strength, start at what many people call ‘the core.’  That would be your abs and trunk.  You know, the part that joins your top and bottom.  Sure you can make a strong top and a strong bottom individually, but if the middle is weak the top and bottom can’t really work together or complement each other.  Your ‘core’ doesn’t need to be ripped either.  Plenty of people have a strong foundation without the six pack and if that’s something you want work on the healthy eating foundation.

Once the foundation is there, build up from there.  Keep building till you get to a set goal and rebuild some more from there, kind of like adding another story to a building.

If you’ve had a strong foundation in the past it can be rebuilt.  Find what needs to be corrected within it and start the rebuild.  It’s likely still there, just needs the field around it cleared to get to it.

“Because if you have a strong foundation like we have, then you can build or rebuild anything on it.  But if you’ve got a weak foundation you can’t build anything.” – Jack Scalia

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The Runner’s High and Strong

Most of us have heard of the Runner’s High.  If not, here’s a quick link to wikipedia regarding it.  RUNNER’S HIGH.  Keep in mind, it’s on the internet so it must be true.  Ha.

This came up in discussion the other night in one of my kettlebell classes.  My wife says she doesn’t experience this event.  I’m not convinced I do either, but a few in the class do.  They’re wound up afterward and can’t climb down for a while.  Fair enough.  Gotta love endorphins.

I practice in the morning so I’m not concerned about losing sleep from being jacked up after swinging a kettlebell a few hundred times.  If I do experience any form of Runner’s High getting to the office ‘wound up’ may not be a bad thing.

What I do experience is long term effects.  While I’m not sure I get the immediate effect many get from a Runner’s High I do get the long term effects of practicing on a reasonably regular basis.

I’m stronger.  Not as strong as I want to be, though.  I will continue to practice.

I’m somewhat more flexible.  Not as flexible as I want to be, though.  I will continue to practice.

I’m slowing down the aging process.  At least I hope I am.  I’m not as old as I’m gonna get.  Funny thing is aging doesn’t take any practice.  Slowing it down does.  I will continue to practice.

No matter what your goal is (the Runner’s High or the above long term effects I feel I am getting), move.  Get stronger.  Strong feels good.  It looks good and, well, quite frankly, it’s kinda handy.

And trust me on this, you’re never too old to start.


Broken? Again?

Ugh.

It seems just as I get a head of steam going, something silly happens and I get injured.

Yep, I was rescuing a small child from a burning building.  Ya, that’s it.  That’s exactly what I was doing.

Well, that’s a blatant lie.  The truth of the matter is, I don’t even know what I did.

What I do know is it seems my sacroiliac joint is not pleased with something I did.  My guess is this is still from a year ago when I hobbled out of the gym and then dealt with the worst pain I have ever experienced.

Physio, chiro, Graston, A.R.T. have all helped but haven’t cured the issue.

I’m gonna try something new.  I.M.S.  Intra Muscular Stimulation.  I was told recently it’s like getting a massage with a needle.  Well, that doesn’t sound fun at all.  But apparently it works and works well.

Tuesday is the big day.  If this blog suddenly goes dead, you’ll have an idea why.

I read a great quote today: “It is easier to build strong children then to repair broken men” ~ Frederick Douglass

As I re-read this quote, I wonder how much of the struggles I’m having with my hip and low back stemmed from years of inactivity.

In high school I was lean.  We worked hard in phys ed.  Seriously.  Stuff that seemed ridiculous at the time, but looking back now was amazing.  And most of it was bodyweight stuff.  I don’t remember using a single piece of machinery.  Not one.  I was in such good shape I had a six pack!

After high school I became pretty inactive and, well, not in very good shape at all.  For years in fact.  Close to twenty.  I’d like a do over.

Trying to tell a teenager how important their health is and they should start taking care of it now is like smacking your head against a brick wall.

My suggestion, as a parent, lead by example.  Sooner or later (hopefully sooner) they’ll catch on and see the importance.  Because truly it is easier to become strong young and stay strong old instead of trying to get repaired every six months.

I’ll let ya know how the IMS goes.